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July 9, 2005

M$M/Republican/Democratic Conformity

-- by Gary Boatwright

The simple truth is that the M$M is only part of the problem. How is it possible that with DeLay, Cunningham and Abramhoff all up to their eyeballs in blatant corruption, not a single Democrat, in either the House or the Senate, has seen fit to file a complaint?

From David Sirota's online Magazine, Sirotablog, Why America Needs Less Mindless Conformity:

Think about it for a second. If you are in Washington, D.C.'s Republican/Democratic Establishment circles, it is considered nothing short of disgusting or fringe to think we should, for instance, set an exit strategy in Iraq, or renegotiate the corporate-written "free" trade deals that are wreaking so much havoc on our middle class.

If you are in business, you are considered weird for keeping in mind anything other than the bottom line, no matter what laws and ethics you have to break.

If you are in media, you are considered a freak if you suggest reporting on serious issues instead of Michael Jackson, if you suggest putting on air anyone other than the same tired, old, out-of-touch Beltway pundits who regurgitate the same idiotic talking points.

That's an excellent capsulation of the Elite Corporate Consensus. The M$M and both political parties are dominated by a corporate mindless conformity that makes Big Brother proud. O'Reilly is just more brazen about his obsequious surrender to mindless pablum for the masses than Matthews and Russert. They all drink from the same cup of M$M conformity.

. But as San Francisco Chronicle columnist Mark Morford tells us, conformity is exactly what the powers that be want - and is exactly what we shouldn't give them.

Money quote from Morford on the Conformity Consensus:

And truly, this mind-set is the national plague, a fate worse than death.

How did this guy get hired? Somebody at the S.F. Chronicle forgot to drink the Corporate Consensus Kool-Aid:

Work hard and the world respects you. Work hard and you can have anything you want. Work really extra super hard and do nothing else but work and ignore your family and spend 14 hours a day at the office and make 300 grand a year that you never have time to spend, sublimate your soul to the corporate machine and enjoy a profound drinking problem and sporadic impotence and a nice 8BR mini-mansion you never spend any time in, and you and your shiny BMW 740i will get into heaven.
That sounds exactly like what my company wants me to do for $40 grand a year, an apartment and a shiny new Hyundai.
This is the American Puritan work ethos, still alive and screaming and sucking the world dry. Work is the answer. Work is also the question. Work is the one thing really worth doing and if you're not working you're either a slacker or a leech, unless you're a victim of BushCo's budget-reamed America and you've been laid off, and therefore it's OK because that means you're out there every day pounding the pavement looking for work and honing your resume and if you're not, well, what the hell is wrong with you?

Back in the day they said you are what you eat. Today you are what you do for a living.

Our culture allows almost no room for creative breaks. There is little tolerance for seeking out a different kind of "work" that doesn't somehow involve cubicles and widening butts and sour middle managers monitoring your e-mail and checking your Web site logs to see if you've wasted a precious 37 seconds of company time browsing blowfish.com or reading up on the gay marriage apocalypse.

This is where Morford works in his money quote:
And truly, this mind-set is the national plague, a fate worse than death.

One of the primary chains to identical office cubicles inside identical concrete cubicles is health insurance:

Giving up her respectable gig was insanely stressful and wracked with doubt. Leave a honest job? Give up paid health care? Have no reliable source of income for months on end? Trade calm stability for risk and random chance? No way, most people say. And of course, it was the absolute best choice she could've made. Time instantly became more fluid and meaningful. Mental clutter vanished. Possibility grinned.

America is not a Christian nation. Our true religion is Consumerism, which American Puritanism has absorbed and regurgitates from pulpits and televangelist broadcasts every day of the week and twice on Sunday as The Prosperity Gospel. In America even religion is big business. God is your CEO and Greenspan is Pope. He demands slavish sacrifices at the corporate alter. Or does He?

But the truth is, God, the divine true spirit loves nothing more than to see you unhinge and take risk and invite regular, messy, dangerous upheaval. This is exactly the energy that thwarts the demons of stagnation and conservative rot and violent sanctimonious bloody Mel Gibson-y religion, one that would have all our work be aimed at continuously patching up our incessant potholes of ugly congenital guilt, as opposed to contributing to the ongoing orgiastic evolution of spirit.

I've heard a rumor that Jesus is coming back and he's really pissed off at the money changers worshipping Mammon in Mega Churches. How can we help Him turn the tables on the money changers in the temple?
It is not for everyone. It implies incredibly difficult choices and arranging your life in certain ways and giving up certain luxuries and many, many people seemed locked down and immovable and all done with exploring new options in life, far too deeply entrenched in debts and family obligations and work to ever see such unique light again. Maybe you know such people. Maybe you are such people.

But then again, maybe not. This is the other huge truism we so easily forget: There is always room. There are always choices we can begin to make, changes we can begin to invite, rules we can work to upset, angles of penetration we can try to explore. And if that's not worth trying, well, what is?


Where would Jesus work?

Posted by Gary Boatwright at July 9, 2005 4:31 PM

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