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August 15, 2005

Corruption and Oversight - Give Subpoena Power to the Minority Party

-- by Dave Johnson

Kos writes that Corruption isn't a partisan issue,

The moral imperative behind a "clean government" crusade is self-evident. But there's also a practical reason to oppose corruption even amongst Democrats -- it's a sure-fire way to lose elections. Rampant Democratic corruption cost us Congress in 1994, and we've yet to recover. And continued Democratic corruption has made House Dems wary of charging ahead with the "corruption" theme to hard, lest some of the current members get snared in the web.
Well, we currently have one of the most corrupt Congresses in our history, and it is not costing them much with the electorate. But that's because the power brings them the power to cover up.

I have a modest proposal that might help in the future, helping expose Congressional corruption but especially with administration corruption: give subpoena power to the minority party a well as the majority party. Currently Democrats in the House and Senate have no power to do anything about the obvious, blatant corruption that is draining our treasury and our pockets. The Republican majority not only refuses to do anything about the corruption, the block all efforts by the Democrats to do something about it. With the power to compel witnesses to testify they could provide a degree of oversight.

Of course there need to be limits to prevent witch-hunts like we saw in the Clinton years, using subpoena power to harrass and destroy people.

Posted by Dave Johnson at August 15, 2005 9:13 AM

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