« Over The Rainbow | Main | What The Hell Are We Doing In Iraq? »


August 20, 2005

DEA strikes a blow against "marajuana legalization movement"

-- by Thomas Leavitt

This is outrageous: The Canadian Police have arrested marajuana legalization activist Marc Emery (a Canadian citizen, and founder/head of the British Columbia Marajuana Party) and two employees of his marajuana seed distribution company. This was done at the request of the U.S. Federal Drug Enforcement Agency (which obviously has nothing better to do, like taking out meth labs and breaking up crack distribution networks). They are attempting to have him extradited to the US, where if convicted, he faces prison time (up to ten years), and is even theoretically subject to life in prison or the death penalty, as a "drug kingpin" (ala Pablo Escobar). Why? Well, the quote below tells you: a transparent attempt to suppress a political point of view. Facism, pure and simple.

a column by Joel Connelly in the Seattle Post-Intelligencer this morning quotes a statement by DEA chief Karen Tandy suggesting political motivations: " Today's arrest of Mark (sic) Scott Emery, publisher of Cannabis Culture magazine and the founder of a marijuana legalization group, is a significant blow not only to the marijuana trafficking trade in the US and Canada, but also to the marijuana legalization movement... Hundreds of thousands of dollars of Emery's illicit profits are known to have been channeled to marijuana legalization groups active in the United States and Canada. Drug legalization lobbyists now have one less pot of money to rely on."

Here's the full article, from stopthedrugwar.org: Marc Emery Busted -- Canada's Leading Marijuana Activist Facing Life in American Prison Over Seed Sales

Here's the full column quoted above: Pursuit of drug case all smoke, no fire

Take action: encourage the Canadian government to refuse extradition for actions that are either not crimes under Canadian law, or for which the penalties in the U.S. are vastly greater than in Canada.

Send a message to Canada's Minister of Justice Irwin Cotler at
webadmin@justice.gc.ca
or fax 613-954-0811
or mail
The Honourable Irwin Cotler
Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada
284 Wellington Street
Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0H8

Posted by Thomas Leavitt at August 20, 2005 6:15 PM

Trackback Pings

TrackBack URL for this entry:
http://www.seeingtheforest.com/cgi-bin/mt/mt-t.fcgi/696


Comments

The US-Canada extradition treaty, I'm told, makes a specific exemption against extraditing politically motivated prosecutions. See here, for example. I suspect the hotheads at the DEA might have forgotten this, or are choosing to pretend it's not there...

Posted by: ArC [TypeKey Profile Page] at August 20, 2005 9:57 PM

This is a much better use of our resources than education and treatment. Some of those seeds could end up in the hands of cancer patients and the terminally ill. No good would come of that.

Much better to boss the neighbors around than deal with the methanphetamine problem.

Posted by: grannyinsanity [TypeKey Profile Page] at August 20, 2005 11:26 PM

Is the methamphetamine problem really a problem, or are we just taking the government's word that it is? Someone sent me an article about this and unfortunately I dumped it. I wish I hadn't. It might have been an Op-Ed piece in the NY Times pointing out that this is a fake issue constructed because the totally ineffective DEA has to make noise about some new crisis or lose credibility. Amphetamines were pretty harmlessly sold over the counter -- until when, exactly? They used to be standard in over the counter diet pills. A doctor prescribed them for me once when I was feeling extra worn out, but it turns out I can't take them.

A few years ago I was very impressed by how paranoid Customs was about drugs when I was traveling. This was before 9/11 and I could have been a mad bomber, a smuggler of anything but drugs, an international spy or thief, and they'd never have noticed, but I had to swear a zillion times and sign a zillion forms that there was NO WAY anyone could have tampered with me or my luggage and inserted any packages of illicit drugs and if they found anything I understood I could go to jail forever. Now they look for box cutters and razors and scissors too and make you take off your shoes, and the whole process seems to be mainly an excuse to feel up pretty girls.

Posted by: MJ [TypeKey Profile Page] at August 21, 2005 5:48 AM

Oh, meth is a problem. My mom was a psych nurse for many years. Trust me. It's a problem. Meth is not only very addictive, it's dangerous to make and results in users reaching a psychotic state by the time they crash and sleep it off for extended periods of time. It is extremely dangerous for the young children of meth addicts, who basically abandon the children, often time while cooking the stuff, with all the toxic chemical by-products lingering around.

Posted by: Dr. Laniac [TypeKey Profile Page] at August 21, 2005 12:29 PM

I've had some friends who were users and former users, meth is a problem, increased crime, child abandonment/endangerment, it fills the burn centers and poisons the environment.

Meth ages people quickly and it rots their teeth. I think about meth mouth quite a lot lately, and I think I need to confront a lloved one with raging dental problems.

Posted by: grannyinsanity [TypeKey Profile Page] at August 21, 2005 1:48 PM

Notice I said "meth labs". These are definitely a problem, in terms of environmental contamination, potential for industrial accidents that produce chemical contamination/clouds/explosions, etc. etc. plus the people who operate them are often just plain scary folks.

... and meth/speed, etc. abuse is unquestionably an issue for some people. On the other hand, I've read the article referenced, and I agree that isn't the rampant epidemic that the DEA and other law enforcement types would like to portray it as.

In general, I'm in favor of wholesale reform of our drug policy, take it out of the hands of law enforcement, and address it as the medical/social problem it is (this would also remove a vast proportion of the money funding criminal enterprises and gang violence): legalize it, regulate distribution, tax the hell out of it, wrap social service and outreach programs around it.

My point was that there are immediate and pressing priorities which the DEA is not addressing, and instead it is choosing to waste resources on a marginal case related to an almost harmless drug, for transparently political reasons.

Posted by: Thomas Leavitt [TypeKey Profile Page] at August 21, 2005 3:29 PM

fuck what they say this is my life
tring 2 tell us what to do like someone with mental illness
i feel this to all my boyz merry xmas
everything still looks delicous
i'm blazed so amazed that i could make an impact
slow 2 react i make my fingers go snap
crackle and pop till i drop it like it's hot
hold on wait a second fuck all u cops

Posted by: jay at December 5, 2005 5:40 AM

i love drugs!!!!!!!!!

Posted by: jason at January 4, 2006 5:47 AM

Post a comment

Thanks for signing in, . Now you can comment. (sign out)

(If you haven't left a comment here before, you may need to be approved by the site owner before your comment will appear. Until then, it won't appear on the entry. Thanks for waiting.)


Remember me?



Email this entry to:


Your email address:


Message (optional):


Return to main page