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May 10, 2006

Quick Mac Question

-- by Dave Johnson

I have a quick Mac question. Can anyone tell me why something called Apple VNC (corrected from VCN) would be running on a PowerBook (running the latest OSX), without the owner knowing it's there?

Posted by Dave Johnson at May 10, 2006 11:40 AM

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Comments

Perhaps you meant "VNC" rather than "VCN"...? How do you know this is running?

Posted by: Charles [TypeKey Profile Page] at May 10, 2006 12:26 PM

It stands for Virtual Computer Network. I believe it's part of what we used to call Open Transports. I could be wrong, but I think it's a necessary overlay from the built-in networking of OSX to the unix kernel.

Leave it be.

Posted by: Mark Adams [TypeKey Profile Page] at May 10, 2006 12:40 PM

I don't have it on mine. I have never heard of it. The closest thing I can find in VNC (Virtual Network Computer) but that's not something Apple supplies.

Posted by: paul [TypeKey Profile Page] at May 10, 2006 1:46 PM

Dave - do a search for "Apple VNC" on Google. That should give you all the answers you need.

Posted by: Thomas Leavitt [TypeKey Profile Page] at May 11, 2006 1:27 PM

It is part of "Remote Access" If all your ports are closed on sharing ( default) should not be a problem. It is a feature for network admins.

On a stand alone machine there is no need for it ( I believe)

If you are a stand alone client on a network you don't need it. ( I believe)

Check the Apple support page they have several articles etc. on VNC

Posted by: rational [TypeKey Profile Page] at May 11, 2006 2:34 PM

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