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December 29, 2006

Today's Voting Machines Story - Who Are Our Elections FOR?

-- by Dave Johnson

Usually at Seeing the Forest we ask, "Who is our economy FOR?" We do this to point out that in a democracy the people are supposed to be in control, make the decisions, and decide on rules that make things better for the public. Corporations are supposed to exist to serve US, not the other way around.

Today Seeing the Forest is asking a different question: Who are our ELECTIONS for? Here is why: Florida judge rules against Democrat in disputed election,

A judge ruled Friday the Democrat who narrowly lost the race to succeed U.S. Representative Katherine Harris in Congress cannot examine the programming code of the electronic voting machines used in the disputed election, saying Christine Jennings' arguments about the possibility of lost votes were "conjecture."

... State officials have declared Republican Vern Buchanan the winner by 369 votes. But 18,000 electronic ballots showed no votes cast in the House race, and Jennings contends the machines lost the votes.

Well one way to take it past "conjecture" is to look at the code running on the machines and SEE if it screwed up! Then we'll KNOW, instead of having to "conjecture" about it.

So we are NOT ALLOWED TO KNOW how our voting machines even WORK? We are not allowed to ask if the code in these machines WORKS?

WHO ARE OUR ELECTIONS FOR if we're not even allowed to know how the votes are "counted?"

Posted by Dave Johnson at December 29, 2006 5:23 PM

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Comments

hope he appeals. anjd the dems put a stop to this bullshit

Posted by: dr o [TypeKey Profile Page] at January 2, 2007 12:15 PM

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