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August 12, 2008

So-Called Choice In Medical Insurance

-- by Dave Johnson

TPMCafe | Talking Points Memo | The Fictions of a Free Market

Too often, "choice" means that we are "free to choose"--in fact forced to choose--what we can afford. When it comes to health-care "menu" is code for a tiered system If you are middle-class, even if you are upper-middle-class, you may find that reformers who promise "universal coverage" are, in fact, offering an array of "choices to fit every pocketbook." And unless you happen to be perched on the top step of a five-step economic ladder, you may well discover that the only insurance policy that fits your purse really shouldn't be called "insurance." Either the co-pays and deductibles are so high that you can't afford to use it--or when you do use it, you'll be told that the treatment you most need isn't "covered." So-called "Swiss cheese" policies are filled wiht holes that open, like trap doors, when you most need protection.
Go read.

One of the comments following the post:

We "free Americans", as market participants, do in fact have a choice, as is constantly noted by Conservatives: we can choose to sell our souls and buy everything we're sold, buy into all the BS we're told, and live like we're "supposed to", like everybody else who believes that the keys to a good life are a fancy car, an obedient spouse, a few kids, credit card debt for useless items, and a wide-screen tv with 80+ sports channels, hoping all the while no one in the family ever gets sick.
Or we can choose to fight this massive lie of the "American Dream", and grow steadily alone, bankrupt and insane - but they're correct, it IS OUR CHOICE.

Posted by Dave Johnson at August 12, 2008 8:11 PM


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